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Past

2017 Fox Valley Area High School Glass Exhibition
March 4 – April 2, 2017

The Fox Valley Area High School Glass Exhibition at Bergstrom-Mahler Museum of Glass opened on Saturday, March 4th to showcase talented young area artists and celebrate national Youth Art Month.

The museum offered schools an opportunity to bring students to the museum to work in The Glass Studio with artists, Sarah Rezin, Beth Wenger Johnstone, Jed Schleisner, Tom Galbraith and Megan Wagner.  Over the past several weeks 242 students from 16 area schools created work for the exhibition including:  Appleton West, Berlin, Chilton, Freedom, Menasha, Neenah, New London, Omro, Oshkosh North, Oshkosh West, Renaissance, St. Mary Catholic, Seymour, Stockbridge, Valders, and Xavier.

Throughout the months of January and February, students worked in the glass studio creating objects using flame working techniques to make beads and Borosilicate glass to create detailed sculptures.  As students worked with neon artist, Jed Schleisner, they bent glass tubing over a torch to create a lighted sculpture filled with Krypton and Neon.

Students experimented with a variety of fused glass methods including open weave fusing, reactive glass techniques, whereby specific glasses are layered on top of one another to create color reactions with the metals in the different glass layers. Students also included copper foil and wire in their creations. The majority of the works exhibited were created during these workshops. Additional artwork created at the schools was also on display.

 

Bending Brilliance: Neon and Plasma Sculpture

Abbey Normal, Jacob Fishman

Abbey Normal, Jacob Fishman

09.10.2016 – 02.19.2017

Bending Brilliance: Neon and Plasma Sculpture is an exhibition of works by artists who use light as their medium. Since the early 20th century, neon lights have been used in advertising signage. From those beginnings the art form has evolved to include works by artists who use light, dark and shadow to transform an environment, create a composition or extend the familiar genre of signage to playful use of puns and thought-provoking themes.

In this exhibit, view work from neon artists who play with light and illumination. In the kinetic plasma sculptures science and art blend to provide a sense of animation, science fiction and wonder for the viewer. Together, these artists provide a magical and whimsical combination of individual styles.

Exhibiting artists include

John E. Bannon Sarah Blood
Bradley Corso Jacob Fishman
Roy Tom Galbraith Petrie Fishman
Ed Kirshner Mitch LaPlante
Bruce Nauman Jed Schleisner
Wayne Strattman Monica Wulfers
Michael Young

 

THANK YOU: AN EXHIBITION OF CAST GLASS BY JEFFREY STENBOM

June 4 – August 21, 2016

In this installation, the works form a cohesive message that speaks to the void left for all of us over senseless loss and destruction, crossing the shattered boundaries and

Everlasting Impact, 2015

Everlasting Impact, 2015

weaving together threads to create a new whole. Art is a powerful tool that has equipped Jeffrey Stenbom, and Iraq War veteran, with a language to speak beyond the words of destruction and proffer healing. Stenbom immerses you, the viewer, in a world of artifacts and remnants devoid of identity in order to place you, in the middle of the action. You stand in the footprints of the soldier; you become the Unknown Soldier. His repurposed uniforms are woven into a universal symbol for which they stand. Thank You is an installation that can speak to all of us, not just warriors or veterans, but to those who have suffered and overcome grief, anguish, desperation and deep despair. Bergstrom-Mahler Museum of Glass has examined the medium of glass for its functional, decorative as well as gloriously sculptural capabilities of playing with light for many years, and is pleased to demonstrate the continuum. Here, Stenbom uses the method of installation art as a provocative means to immerse you into the space as a participant within a unified arrangement of objects assembled to create meaning. As a contemporary material, glass is capable of using its properties of transparency, translucency, opacity, strength and fragility to transform a message into something deeply meaningful. Throughout the centuries of its use, glass has been an alluring material that has amazed the maker and the beguiled the beholder. We invite you to absorb its poignant message through its transformational properties.

Transcending Time: A Survey of Works in Glass by Italian Maestro Lino Tagliapietra

Lino Tagliapietra, Concerto di Primavera 2000

Lino Tagliapietra, Concerto di Primavera 2000

October 8, 2015 – February 14, 2016

Since the mysterious lure of the glass factory on the Island of Murano drew him in at the age of 11, glass has been intertwined with his soul. Lino Tagliapietra earned the honor of Maestro by the time he was 25. Over the course of his illustrious career, he has traveled extensively, first sharing his Italian masterful techniques with Americans and they with him. This began with a visit to Murano by Dale Chihuly in 1968 and Lino followed with a visit to Pilchuck in 1978. The exchange has led to in an ever-changing exploration of glass as an expressive material: alive, flowing and boldly colorful. These results of unparalleled workmanship, continuous innovation, and collaboration can be seen in this exhibition of over 50 works by the Maestro.

View the exhibition catalog.

Works were on loan with the assistance of Schantz Gallery, Lino Tagliapietra, Inc. and private collections organized by Bergstrom-Mahler Museum of Glass.

William Morris: Native Species

William Morris, Selections from Native Species, 2004

William Morris, Selections from Native Species, 2004

The George R. Stroemple Collection. A Stroemple/Stirek Collaboration
April 18 – September 6, 2015

Throughout history, patrons of the Arts have brought the work of talented artists to the public. William Morris: Native Species demonstrates this modern story of collaboration and patronage between artist, William Morris, and collector, George R. Stroemple.

Morris and Stroemple, friends for many years, share a respect for the profound beauty of the natural world, which grew into the 2004 commission of 38 vessels inspired by the flora and fauna of the Pacific Northwest. Morris pays homage to the 19th century French Art Nouveau glass artist Emile Galle, as well as honors Stroemple’s request to consider the shapes and colors of the 19th century Japanese Meiji period objects he also collects.

The resulting works adeptly articulate all of these references while retaining their own presence, intricately wrought with pine needles and cones, aspen trees, dragonflies, pheasants, ground squirrels, acorns, wild grasses, lizards, and cedar boughs.

Beauty Beyond Nature: The Glass Art of Paul Stankard

Paul Stankard, Honeybee Swarm Orb, 2010

Paul Stankard, Honeybee Swarm Orb, 2010

Organized by The Robert M. Minkoff Foundation
September 13, 2014 – February 15, 2015

Beauty Beyond Nature: The Glass Art of Paul Stankard presents 70 works spanning the influential career of this artist from the private collection of Robert M. Minkoff. Minkoff encountered Paul Stankard’s work in 2005, and in a brief period built a definitive collection that has chronicled one artist’s creative journey in glass for us all.

Retrospective: an Exhibition of Kiln-formed Glass, Organized by Bullseye Glass, Co.

Klaus Moje, Object 12, 2005

Klaus Moje, Object 12, 2005

April 12 — August 24, 2014

In 1974, two recent graduates from the University of Wisconsin and one from San Jose State University set up a glass factory in the backyard of a ramshackle house in Portland, Oregon. The Bullseye Glass Company was founded with collaboration and experimentation at its core. Forty years later this legacy is seen in the work of artists who have worked with Bullseye to develop new materials and techniques.

Featured Artists: Klaus Moje, Catharine Newell, Jessica Loughlin, Silvia Levenson, Richard Whiteley, Narcissus Quagliata, Rafael Cauduro, Stacy Lynn Smith, April Surgent and Tanja Pak

 

Glass Artists of the New North: Creativity in Our Midst

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Beth Lipman, Still Life with Detritus, 2013

September 15, 2013 – February 16, 2014

This exhibit features the creative and innovative work of nationally and internationally renowned glass artists who live and work in The New North region. Within the Northeast Wisconsin area, there are a number of accomplished artists who are recognized for their capabilities of enriching the intellectual, economic and creative environments of the region. These artists have managed their own businesses as gallery owners, artist and entrepreneurs, creating work for exhibit and sale to a national audience. The goal of this exhibition is to meld the interest in innovation in the business community with the creativity and innovation of the artists in our midst.

Featured Artist: Beth Lipman, Michael Meilahn, Charles Savoie, Deanna Clayton, Keith Clayton, Stephanie Trenchard, Jeremy Popelka, Wes Hunting, Scott Amrheim, Jon Chapman, Thomas Fleming, Wesley Hunting, Beth Wenger – Johnstone, Cory Kwakkel, Jenna Larson, Linda Muldoon, Nick Nebel, Kristin Thielking, Keven Brunett, Mary Jo Weidert, Sharon Fujimoto, and Mitch Baker

University of Wisconsin – River Falls Glass Legacies

Michael Meilahn, Red Ball III, Smart Number Series, 2010

Michael Meilahn, Red Ball III, Smart Number Series, 2010

April 13- September 1, 2013

Started in 1968 by Doug Johnson and taken over by Jon Engrebretson, the UW-River Falls glass program is one of the oldest BFA glass programs in the country. The program has produced countless talented and successful alumni. This exhibit focuses on the legacy started by early glass students as well as the work of more recent alumni.

Featured Artists: Eoin Breadon, Patrick Casanova, Jon Clark, Stephan Cox, Pauly Cudd, Jim Engrebretson, Renee Engrebretson, Erik Halvorson, Doug Johnson, Fred Kaemmer, Gene Koss, Joseph Limpert, Michael Meilahn, Colleen Ott, Nolan Prohaska and Brita Swanson

Button Bonanza: The Debut of the William H. Blanning Bequest with Selections from the Beadell Collection

August 6 – September 8, 2013

Button Bonanza features selections from the nearly 300 glass buttons from the estate of William H. Blanning of Washington, D.C. Many of the objects are stunning paperweight buttons, which as their name suggests, resemble glass paperweights in miniature form.

These tiny works of art demonstrate the incredible artistic and technical abilities of their makers.
Artists featured in the exhibition include Charles Kaziun, John Gooderham, Ray Banford, and Ronald and Dorothy Hansen.

The Legacy of Littleton and His Students

Harvey Littleton, Blue Mobile Arc, 1988

Harvey Littleton, Blue Mobile Arc, 1988

September 15, 2012 – February 24, 2013

This glass exhibition joined with 160 others across the nation in 2012 to celebrate Harvey K. Littleton and the founding of the American Studio Glass Movement. As a University of Wisconsin-Madison art professor in the early 1960s, Littleton began the first university glass program and forever changed how we view art through glass.

Featured Artists: Harvey Littleton, Christopher Ries, Dale Chihuly, David Huchthausen, Tom McGlauchlin, Audrey Handler, Gary Beecham, Fritz Dreisbach, Michael Taylor, Marvin Lipofsky, Henry Halem, John Brekke, Bill Boysen, Vernon Brejcha, Brent Cox, Jack Ink, Kent Ipsen, Colleen Ott, Tom Philabaum, Dan Schwoerer, John Littleton and Kate Vogel

Ricky Bernstein’s Kitchen Dreams and Other Stories

Ricky Bernstein, Kitchen Dreams, 2004

Ricky Bernstein, Kitchen Dreams, 2004

April 14-September 2, 2012

Step into a comical world of 1950’s pop culture with Ricky Bernstein’s Kitchen Dreams. Using glass, aluminum and childhood memories, artist Ricky Bernstein pieces together everyday life through a caricature of social roles and cultural icons. Bernstein’s life-sized collages animate a bold, bright, somewhat surreal world, bound to bring you a good belly laugh.

All That Glitters

Christopher Reis, Desert Flower, 2004

Christopher Reis, Desert Flower, 2004

October 1, 2011 – February 19, 2012

All That Glitters was based on the simplicity of form and glimmer of glass in contemporary cold-worked sculpture. Experience the sensuality of light as it is manipulated by artists and transformed into color and pattern. Artists were selected based on the visual effects of their sculpture and the common theme of working in cold glass methods: polishing, cutting, laminating and faceting, to exploit the reflective and transmissive qualities of light that glass manages like no other material, except perhaps, diamonds.
Featured Artists: Christopher Ries, Kreg Kallenberger, Toland Sand, Sidney Hutter, David Huchthausen, Jon Kuhn, Michael Taylor and Donald Friedlich

Glass from the Habsburgs to the Czech Republic

Unknown, Humpen,

Unknown, Humpen,

October 9, 2010 – January 2, 2011

Glass from the Habsburgs to the Czech Republic features the museum collections complemented by loans of other glass from Central Europe to develop a chronological view of some of the highest artistic achievements between 1573 to the present day.The exhibition showcases the exquisite collection of Germanic Glass drinking vessels given by Ernst and Carol Mahler, founding members and former presidents of the board of directors.

In addition, selections from the personal collection of Eric Kaplan and Barbara Moser of Moser Art Glass, created in Meierhofen near Karlsbad, as well as Bohemian and Czechoslovakian paperweights from the collection of Gary and Marge McClanahan are included in the exhibition. Contemporary Glass of Central Europe including Germany, the Czech Republic and Poland from five private collections will complete the timeline of artistic achievements in glass over a period of nearly 500 years.

The Italian Influence in Glass

October 10- February 21, 2010

The Italian Influence in Glass considered the origins of techniques from the Romans, to the considerable innovations in style of the Venetians,

Stephen Powell, Sultry Jealous Cheeks, 2001

Stephen Powell, Sultry Jealous Cheeks, 2001

and now the work that artisans of Murano are presenting for glass artists to infuse into a new bold statement. Examples of the Italian influence in this exhibition are objects created with mosaic techniques from the Roman Empire of the mid first century B.C.E. to the mid first century.

The influence continues to the paperweight form of the 19th century and carries through to the current period with the innovative work of the Venini, Barovier, and Seguso factories. As before, these artists have influenced the work of contemporary glass artists such as Harvey Littleton, Dale Chihuly, Lino Tagliapietra and Richard Ritter, and others. Wisconsin artists include, Michael Meilahn, Wes Hunting, Jeremy Popelka and Charles Savoie.